Tag Archives for " Cameron "

youth ministry

A Wall of Living Stones at Caswell

camwall1

One of my favorite stories of all time, from May 2014. 

When the youth group goes to Fort Caswell for the spring retreat, one of the many traditions involves a team building exercise known as The Wall. The Wall is about 10-12 feet high and 6-8 feet wide and kids who choose to participate scale the wall with others in their grade. It’s always a beautiful thing to watch.

This year, Cameron, a 16 year old who has been raised in the church, made his first trip to Caswell. He’d been on other youth trips, but not this one; so he’d never seen The Wall, never participated in this tradition. Of course, he didn’t have to do it. No one would have objected if he’d taken a pass.

You see, since birth, Cameron has developed at a different speed than other children. One orthopedist even told his parents not to expect much in the way of gross motor development, saying that Cameron would likely be in a wheelchair. (His parents got a different orthopedist.) It took him awhile, but with the help of a kid-sized walker, Cameron put one foot in front of the other, and by the time he was four and a half years old, he was walking on his own. These days, while his muscle tone is still relatively low, he gets around fine. He does, however, walk slower and more intentionally than most folk. And, well, he just has to work a little harder than other people to move through the world.

But back to Caswell’s wall.

“Are you going to climb The Wall, Cameron?” We asked him mostly out of courtesy, not wanting him to feel left out.

“Yep,” he said, looking over his glasses that had once again slipped too far down his nose; and he made his way over to lifelong friends who awaited him at the wall.

Physically, Cameron couldn’t offer much assistance at all. He couldn’t push or pull himself up. He couldn’t reach out or grab hold. If he panicked, he would fall. If he struggled against them, they would drop him.

Cameron put his hands on sure shoulders and lifted a foot onto the human stool; his friends did the rest. One adult and two girls standing on the back of the wall reached down, while several guys at the base helped lift him up. Other teens gathered around, arms extended, ready.

He progressed, inches at the time, eventually straddling the top of the wall. Once there though, he seemed to get stuck. A moment of uncertainty followed when no one was exactly sure how to proceed. Then another teen—a bulky weight lifter—popped up on the back of the wall, reached down, and gently lifted Cameron’s leg up and over.

Cameron got his balance, looked out over the crowd, and hesitantly lifted a hand to wave.

Now for most kids, getting down is easy; but Cameron couldn’t jump off the platform to the ground without injury. No worries! His friends had already figured it out.  Four strong arms waited to cradle Cameron from the wall to the ground. He let go, they held on, and then he was down, smiling at the cheers and congratulations from his youth group.

Cameron punched his fist into the palm of his hand and said, “I did it!”

And he did. He really did.

First Baptist Church of Asheville Youth Group, Fort Caswell 2014

caswallwholegroup14

. . . like living stones, let yourselves be built into a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood . . .
from 1 Peter 2:5

 

Cameron Brown

Thank You #17 Cameron Brown

May 2016, Cameron with some of his best friends.

May 2016, Cameron with some of his best friends.

I've already written a number of posts about Cameron (some of the most popular on my site actually), but I'm not sure I've ever really let him know how much I appreciate who he is as an individual. Thank you #17*: to Cameron Brown.

Dear Cameron,

Happy Birthday! Can you believe you are 19? And how very cool that Finding Dory came out on your birthday! Pixar & Disney must know what a big movie fan you are. Well, they'd have to; so many of their movies seem to point straight to you!

  • Toy Story's theme song, "You've Got a Friend in Me," sounds to me like YOUR theme song! You are so very good at being a friend. You help us slow down when the road is rough ahead. And for your friends? There isn't anything that you wouldn't do. Yep. I know I've got a friend in you, Cameron Brown and I am so grateful!
  • In Monster's Inc., Mike Wazowski says, "You and I are friends. There's nothing more important than our friendship." Just curious, Cameron: did you write that line? Because you sure do make your friends a top priority! Thanks buddy!
  • And Brave? Oh my goodness. I can't believe how brave you are--especially going over that wall at Caswell! I'm scared of that thing, but not you: you just trust your friends and up you go. Merida could take lessons in bravery from you Cameron! (And maybe I could too!)
  • Remember Dug from Up? Now don't go running after any squirrels, but I think you have something in common with Dug. I can just hear you saying something like, "My name is Cameron. I have just met you and I love you." I love the way you love people Cameron!
  • One thing's for sure. If life gets you down, you know what you have to do. You "just keep swimming . . . "

You're basically Woody, Buzz, Mike, Sully, Merida, Dug, and Dory wrapped into one Cameron. Maybe we should start to call you Wuzikely Merdugry?

Wait! I thought of something better!

Happy Birthday Mr. Incredible! Thanks for being awesome!

Love, Aileen

In an extended celebration of my 50th birthday on 7-22-2015, I’m writing 50 thank you notes. (Originally I said in 50 weeks. Now I'll just say, over the course of time . . . .) This one is #17. Please click on the tag "50 Thank You Notes" if you would like to read the others.

My Friend Cameron

by guest blogger, Baker Lawrimore

IMG_3855

“Hey Cameron, need a ride?” We were moving pretty slowly (Cameron can't move as quickly as other kids his age) and we needed to pick up the pace.

“Yep,” he said, beaming as I hoisted him up and headed to the next session of the Fine Arts Camp. I was there as a teen helper; Cameron as a camper.

My friend Cameron Brown is extraordinary. I've thought about it, and I truly can't remember a time when Cameron was grouchy, moody, or even disagreeable. By contrast, he is absolutely delightful, even though his life hasn’t been easy. You see, Cameron has had a developmental disorder since birth. He’s had to take growth hormone shots, has been bullied, and has struggled to learn. Yet, Cameron emits contagious joy. Cameron has taught me a lot about life. Just by being the joyful, grateful person that he is, he blesses the people around him. As a college student, I hope to serve my community by living my life the way my friend Cameron lives his.

*Baker Lawrimore is a high school senior who plans to attend college Fall 2014, majoring in music. He and Cameron have been friends since 2006. 

Gratitude Week 3: Cameron Brown

I've been sorting through some writings on my computer and ran across this one I wrote several years ago about Cameron Brown. I was reminded as I read it what a blessing he is to me, and to so many others as well. 

Cameron's Special Praise ©2008

The children’s choir program included skits, dances, sign language, and of course plenty of singing. Through it all, fifth grader Cameron Brown smiled from the front row to his parents and others in the congregation. He turned and looked at the children behind him. He patted the girl beside him and held her hand. He waved to people he knew. He never sang. Not once.

First Baptist Church of AshevilleRather than distracting his audience, though, Cameron Brown enhanced the experience for worshipers that Wednesday night. Cameron is special—in lots of ways. He’s exceptionally sweet and loving. Church members line up for his hugs and his smile lights up the sanctuary.

And Cameron learns differently than other children. Plus, he grows differently and that makes him a little less sure footed than most kids.

Near the end of the program, the children sang a song while they signed it in American Sign Language. Cameron knew one sign. He watched all the other children and when they got to the word “praise,” Cameron, just like his friends, lifted his hands heavenward. 

So a special “Thank You” today to Cameron for his leadership. He has most assuredly chosen the most excellent way.

Two other posts about this awesome kid can be found here and here.

Beauty in the Baptistry

Cameron Brown in 2009“You are a child of God and God takes great delight in you. God is giving you everything you need to be the person God is calling you to be."

Guy Sayles says those words each time a new believer rises from the baptismal waters. Those of us who attend First Baptist Church of Asheville have heard these phrases many times, but never did they ring truer than they did that day.

Cameron is older than his brother Collin by several years. Yet Collin learns at a higher level, and moves with greater ease than his big bro. He’s what the world would call academically and intellectually gifted. Collin is a delightful child, interacting as easily with kids his age as with the adult friends of his parents. He’s a great kid.

And so is Cameron. But Cameron’s words are sometimes hard even for adults to understand; kids his age too often fail to communicate with him at all. His steps are slow, particularly when stairs are involved. Cameron is what the politically correct of the world would call “special.” And they would be right. They would be right in ways they can’t even imagine.

Cameron’s smile brightens the world around him. His laugh brings joy to all who hear. His ready hugs can lift the lowest of spirits. Cameron understands love. He knows his family loves him, particularly that precocious little brother who does double duty as Cameron’s best friend. He knows that everyone at his church loves him, especially the little girls in his Bible study class who rush to sit beside him and to hold his hand as he goes up and down steps. And, in a way others will never understand, Cameron knows that Jesus loves him. So Cameron, being Cameron, just loves Jesus right back.

Because he is being raised in the Baptist church, part of Cameron’s upbringing has included conversations about making his profession of faith in Jesus Christ. His parents have talked to him about what it means to join the church and have entertained his questions, helping him to understand baptism. Brother Collin had already made his profession of faith privately, but found baptism itself intimidating and therefore hesitated to make his decision public. Not Cameron. Once his mind was made up, it wasn’t long before he stepped right out into that chapel aisle and walked straight to his pastor, letting him and everyone else know that he had chosen to follow Jesus. What’s more, he wanted to confirm his decision by believer’s baptism.

Whoa. This would be complicated. Collin had not even been baptized yet and he is not even scared of water like Cameron is. In fact, just getting Cameron into the baptismal pool and back out again posed enough obstacles to discourage the whole idea.

But Cameron was determined and his courage inspired Collin who decided he was ready for baptism if Cameron was. “This is something the brothers should do together,” Collin told his mother.

Collin went first. Dripping from his dunking, he stepped out of the baptistry. It was Cameron’s turn. The pastor turned to take his hand but Cameron hesitated. (Negotiating stairs is hard enough without water underneath your feet, for goodness sake.) Slowly, he made his way toward Dr. Guy. Within reach, Cameron grasped for his pastor who lifted him into place. Now, most people who are baptized, turn to look at the congregation or gaze toward the pool’s exit. Not Cameron. He turned to face Guy, waiting.

“Cameron, upon your profession of faith in Jesus Christ,” Guy said looking into Cameron’s eager face. Cameron wrapped his arms around his pastor. “I baptize you,” Guy scooped up a handful of water and poured it over Cameron, “in the name of the Father,” another scoop, “and of the Son,” one last handful of water, “and of the Holy Spirit.”

“Cameron, you are a child of God and God takes great delight in you. God is giving you everything you need to be all that God is calling you to be.”

Cameron leaned into Guy’s embrace, and after a moment or two, Guy lifted Cameron out of the baptistry, to walk in newness of life.

Wonder Done Right

Only one child got it right.

Oh, all the children knew their parts; the creation play in this morning’s worship service was lovely. The flowers, colorful and bright, stood tall, blooming and blushing. The birds flapped otheir wings. The fish swooshed, the mice crawled, the frogs hopped. The apple tree, its branches menacing, taunted. The young man who played Adam delivered his lines masterfully, having us laughing at all the right times. Eve entered the garden, singing with a voice that sounded as if it had indeed been created by God for this moment in time.

But only one child—only one—captured the wonder.

Our church has been celebrating creation for the last few weeks—art, the written word, music, drama. During this time, sermons, anthems, and special events have focused on the beauty of creation, more specifically on the wonder of the Creator. The point, it seems, has been to bring our minds, our hearts, to a state of amazement. We’ve had the work of a local artist hanging in our atrium: wall sized paintings depicting the explosive dynamics of creation. We’ve had dancers—yes dancers in our Baptist sanctuary—offering their gifts in worship. We even had kites one Sunday (they called them liturgical kites to make them sound more churchy but they were kites all the same). Our orchestras played, our handbells rang, our authors read from their books. It’s been a time to delight. It’s been a time of awe.

And this morning, Cameron Brown, full of wonder, delighted in the awe of it all.

Of course, Cameron is exceptional, gifted really and it is not fair to compare others to him. Unfortunately, it’s the opposite that usually happens: he’s often compared to others in a most unfair way. (Some people are such slow learners.)

When Cameron came down the aisle this morning wearing a bright red shirt, carrying a gigantic rose-red flower, his eyes sparkled. When his little brother came down, dressed like a mouse, Cameron giggled a little, watching his favorite person mount the stairs then crouch like a critter. He looked around at all his friends standing there with him, his smile growing, his eyes dancing. When the audience laughed, Cameron laughed too. When Eve sang, Cameron watched her every move. And when it was over, all too soon, Cameron stayed in place. He looked around that great big sanctuary, appearing every bit the picture of pure, innocent wonder. The director came to him, he took her hand, and flashed her his full-face grin. And as they slowly made their way back down the aisle, Cameron continued looking over his shoulder. It was as if he didn’t want it to be over, not yet. It was too wonderful, too delightful.

Anyone could tell by the look on his face: Cameron got it. And once again I thought, I want to be more like Cameron. I want to see the world like he does. I want to see God like he does.